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LITHIUM: THE CHALLENGE OF CREATING A NEW INDUSTRY

Agosto 2017

The impetus behind renewable energy and electro mobility is driving increasing demand for lithium, but if Chile fails to take the right steps it could miss the chance to become the global leader in the field. The main challenges towards that goal include progressing from the exportation of the raw material to that of more sophisticated products, while not overlooking the production and refinement of the mineral itself, as well as ensuring the incorporation of new technologies and well-trained human capital.

Read more: http://www.amchamchile.cl/en/2017/04/litio-el-desafio-de-generar-una-nueva-industria-2/

CELiMIN POSITIONS WITH A NEW BRAND

August 2013

 

The Center for Advanced Research in Lithium and Industrial Minerals, launches its new brand in the second half of this year.

Now with a new image, the CELiMIN is positioned as one of the powerful research centers in the area in the north of the country, impacting with new projects, new partnerships and innovations in the research development of the field in which they operate through creating exciting new projects and instances.

1st  INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP "IWLiME"

August 2013

 

The Center for Advanced Research and Industrial Minerals Lithium, CELiMIN, organized the first International Workshop under the name "IWLiME", which is aimed at researchers and practitioners from universities, research centers and graduate students.

 

The main topics to be discussed at the Workshop, are related to the development of lithium batteries, thermal storage, among others. The objective of this activity is to provide current projects that are being generated in areas of energy with emphasis on lithium, in addition to promoting the complement  that is generated by the researches conducted with universities throughout Chile.

JAPAN CREATES MATERIAL TO ENLARGE IN 10 TIMES THE MOBILE BATTERY

August  2013

 

T11he Japanese company Shin-Etsu has developed a material that could increase up to 10 times the capacity of lithium-ion batteries used in  mobile phones.

The Japanese company specializing in semiconductor has been using its technology  to produce the sheets of silicone that retain electric charge in the battery, an alternative to carbon-based materials typically used.

 

Shin-Etsu, which could start producing massively this product in 3 or 4 years, has sent prototypes to battery manufacturers in and outside Japan to study aspects such as cost and wear over time of materials used.